Web Feature Discovery Process – Part 3

This post is the 3rd post about the Web Feature Discovery Process. If you want to read all three articles, click here, to start with article 1, and click here to get to article 2.

So far in this series of articles, I have described dealing and identifying Assets and dealing with People, the two ingredients needed to build any web site feature. The next step is information discovery. The first article talked about Assets. Assets, as I describe in the first article, need to be understood and evaluated in an open and free environment, not restricted by management that has already indicated the final outcome. Knowing the exact, final website product on day one is ok as a goal, but to know the exact way it will work is a not just a mistake, it can create a terrible work environment for those who see the mistakes and can’t fix them. You start with a general idea of where you want to go in development of web features, and great spec’s can make this possible, but there is a transformation that needs to occur between concept and final product, and that is where a lot of websites go awry by simply never fixing what needs to be fixed.

Information Discovery

Information discovery is all about looking through the data, which leads to idea discovery. But even before you go through reams of data, you need to figure out what you are trying to accomplish. This is a bit of a conundrum, like which came first the chicken or the egg. Let’s say you have a web page or a web site that is already doing its job. Your site could be a simple page or 2 or be as large as a 20,000 SKU online catalog. I’ve built both sites in the past. The question is how do you figure out that you need to add a form to collect information or to place ads on the site? How do you know if the site should be a marketplace or a straight e-commerce site. This is not just about data here. This is about business and business models. If you have worked on developing websites, and at this point in time, and a few million people have, based on the fact that millions own domains, you probably know a thing or 2 about making your own website.

In my first post on this subject, I described assets, where you have to look at few key pieces of information. Is there any anomalies showing a possible opportunity, or as Google in their web analytics product calls it, Intelligence? Is this site getting tremendous numbers of visitors? Is this site already collecting email addresses? One site I know of, because I am a part owner, gets an email address added to the system every 10 minutes during the day. This asset is important, because email addresses can be, should be used properly, by properly, I mean when people give you an email address, they are expecting an immediate response. The value of the email starts to go down when you wait 6 months till you email them. The fresher, the more valuable, and that’s because people have a small period of time to read that email you will send them. This has lead to the concept of email sequences. First time I had heard about this was from my business partner, who pointed out a company called InfusionSoft, that is big on it. It’s really a simple concept. You have a series of emails that get sent out to a person that signs up that go out in phases, like one a day, one a week, perhaps growing in length of time. Each email has a different message that is part of an overall strategy. You don’t need InfusionSoft to do this, but they are great at it.

Let The Wind Tell You Where To Go

Often data is telling you something. For instance, on Whois.net, we noticed a high amount of international visitors, yet we did not offer the ability to look up international domains. So we solved the customer’s quandry by offering what they were looking for. So one clue is looking at the key words people search on to get to your site in Google Analytics or Adobe’s/Omniture’s Site Catalyst. This is a simple task and 90% of online marketers know this. What they don’t look for is the missing link. The missing piece is what ties information to a new potential set of features. Another good example is on checkout of most registration sites, there is a term we now call “Co-registration”. Co-registration means the customer was here to signup for x, and you added another potential thing for them to get at the same time. We have considered using this in the event business website I am a partner in. Another interesting anomaly I noticed in the dating business recently, is that people are using Iphones and Android apps to signup, in significant numbers. This is where you have to brain-storm, not about features, but about assumptions. You can confirm these assumptions, through research. My assumption that people are using smartphones, specifically at work during the day, because it offers more privacy, and the employer can’t track you specifically. This is one of many reasons, but the end result is we need to have an app for the Iphone and Android… That is simple detective work. This is the big breakthrough. It is finding a new channel. The big question is having the resources to capitalize on this new channel. It may not be a new channel to you, but to a lot of executives out there, who don’t know how to deal with this channel, it is a strange new world.

In the retail side its called Cross-Sell or Up-Sell. Just sign-up for Godaddy and you will get your complete lesson on up-sell and cross-sell. They are the masters at this. I used to have people say that is not what I would put on the checkout, because it does lead to Friction, one of the key points in the MarketingExperiments.com formula, where it will actually causes less conversion potentially. This all depends on the site. On a dating site, yes, it can slow the process down, especially if the person is not ready to convert. On a retail site, however, when people have made up their minds to buy, only a broken, poorly designed web page can stop them, especially if the deal is an amazingly good value. So most features are figured out as extensions of what you already have in place. If you build on your success, you will succeed even more. There is no need to be radical, as you will find out the hard way…

Slash And Burn

If you let the status quo dictate what you do, or worse, let the current sales and marketing team make all the decisions, you could end up with a situation I call “slash and burn”. I came across the concept of slash and burn, while working on a few sites. The analogy of slash burn comes from the military tactic of burning the crops as you retreat, so your enemy will not have the luxury of food. It refers to the, sometimes unforeseen, consequences of making a decision to kill one part of a website in order to enhance another. This is a human decision process, typically driven by revenues. The best example was on this Whois.net site, where, when I arrived at this company, the previous people who managed it, had attempted to drive all the traffic through links on the site to hosting sales on another site, because that is where the money was for them. This was a major mistake in my mind. Yes, they had driven people to where they make money, but that is not why they came to Whois.net. They were there to look up domains that were available, find out who owns them, and potential buy them.

Consistency

Another very important point I learned from MarketingExperiments.com, and I will discuss them a lot here, is that consistency is real important in the process of building out web features. You have to start at the beginning of the customer path. The beginning is when they are sitting at their computer on Ipad. Let’s say they have not even turned it on. They are interested in South Florida Real Estate, as an example. They open the computer and type those words into Google. Google presents them with relevant results. Let’s say your site is in those results. When you click on one of the links, and let’s say its one of the top paid links, you are delivered to a web page. The words you put in should arrive right in your face at the top of the page in big bold letters. If not, you are not getting a consistent experience. This is true for many of the paid links, because they are using something called Long Tail, which has a few meanings. To me, it means extending the search words they are buying out to more obscure words, to pay less and get more traffic. This would typically mean they are looking to buy “Real Estate”, but it was cheaper to buy “South Florida Real Estate”. This is great for smaller sites and pages that are meant to be for finding this exact stuff, but when you arrive at a generic Real Estate Seminar, you are disappointed. This is not Google’s fault, it’s about people trying to get traffic, and the result is a lot of inconsistency. Your consistency is critical in making your site found well and sticky, a term these marketing guys love to use (meaning they stick around).

Don’t Make Me Think

If you have not read this book, “Don’t Make Me Think” and you work in the web field, you should get it, read it, and live by it. The book’s simplicity, and I will hopefully sum it up here, is that people have developed common methods of experience online. This means that they are expecting the same words, in the same spot, each time they arrive at a web page. A good example is the word “About” or the word “Search”. The book basically says if you say “Quick Search”, you are going to confuse people, and therefor making them think, like is really “Quick” or different. More importantly, if your site is missing any of these common elements, such as the words “About”, “Contact” or “Search”, there is a customer disconnect. And you need to understand that “Search” is a feature. So for the basics, you need to make sure the customer experience is not so different they run away. That also means that placing the word “Search” in the upper right of the page is preferential to let’s say the bottom left. From the web features perspective, deliver to customers at least the minimum they are expecting on the site. More and more, customers are expecting a web form on the home page and sometimes many site pages, where they can put their email address in, maybe with their first name or some additional data and get on that companies’ mailing list.

Short Form or The Long Form

One of questions is whether or not to put a short form or a long form onto a home page. So, inevitably with these kinds of web forms, information collection forms, you have techniques that are learned over time. You can learn this stuff by observing and taking the best of breed (they call it) and do things like this. One of the methods that is recommended is you ask for a small amount of information up front, like just an email address or email address with a first name. On the second page, you would then ask for additional information, saying that they are now on the list and they can further tell you more information about themselves. This two step process like everything, reduces friction on the first step and allows the website visitor to make intelligent choices on the second step. One thing I ran into when working for a hosting company was a situation where they required a domain name when buying hosting. This was a system requirement. It turned out to be a very costly financial requirement. The reason is, and like everything, it came down to how people react. The visitor, in many cases, had not decided on a domain name, so often they would just pick up and leave to figure it out…

This Web Feature discovery process article is 3 in a series of 3 so far. The articles about Web Feature Discovery will continue in a new article next month.

Web Feature Discovery Process – Part 2

This article is the second part of 2 articles on the Web Feature Discovery Process. You probably should click here and read article 1 if you are here for the first time.

Ok, so you have finally figured out the key assets and are starting to go down the road of making your new web feature happen… well let’s just say you are only 20% towards the finish line. There are some major hurdles involved for most of us, including even the big guy or gal at the top. The thinking part of discovering ripe juicy revenue or visitor producing features is the easy part. The difficult part is making it happen, navigating the human beings all along the way, especially when you know they are all trying to make sure you either fail directly, fail indirectly, fail just by the fact that you don’t have the energy to fight anymore, fail because you left the job or fail because the job left you. It is a fight to the death my friend and its all because you sorted through the company assets with a flashlight at night when nobody was looking and you had an idea, you brought it into the daylight, and now you are a pure unadulterated target for those who don’t want you to succeed. So how do you proceed in the most murky of environments…

Social Engineering

I first began to understand social engineering, when I was reading a great article about Kevin Mitnick, the infamous hacker who broke into Sprint and stole tons of information about their customers. He was not genius. He was not very technical. He was basically a petty thief. How did he do it? He used social engineering. If you think about it, social engineering (in the Mitnick version) is about figuring out how to use information and people of an organization to think what you want them to think and do, using that information wisely. Mitnick figured out that when executives names where mentioned, people lose their minds and do what you want. “Uh, Dick Lynch the VP said we need that report now!” Minick found out that if you know some small piece of information or just a name, you could easily navigate an entire organization, call around to people and they would hand you off like you were a friend. He would use person X’s name and say hey person Y, Person X recommended me. What really did is say the VP wanted me to get onto System Z, now so get me a login and password…

The point is, you need to understand the dynamics of the organization, the motivations of people in the organization and the hierarchy of decision-making. Getting the organization on board with you is what I am getting at! But ultimately, like I have said before, you can take the high road or the low road. Taking the high road means bring the organization along on a ride towards success (success means getting your feature implemented).

Education Camp

Sometimes unusual methods are needed in order to gain the trust of execs and the whole organization. For instance, some of the features I was trying to get implemented at my last company required me to make sure that the organization understood the features. What did I do about it? I ran a seminar. Now people in my company who came to my seminar looked at me in strange ways as I ran them. Once again who was I to run a seminar? I was just a programmer there, sometimes a manager, but in no way did I have the keys to the kingdom or really was in charge of much there. Fellow employees would look at me with confused looks. Who was this guy standing up there talking about things? I ran periodic internal seminars at the office. This means a short 45 minute talk, on WordPress for instance. I ran a seminar on Whois. I was planning a seminar on a variety of subjects. What was I doing in my crazy convoluted method was starting the social engineering process by planting seeds through my seminars. I wanted this company to adopt certain strategies and methods. Once again, nobody stopped me from running a talk at noon time in the conference rooms. This is a great place to flesh out your ideas and don’t freak if someone shows up to show you up. My answer to them would be, show me how to do it better!

Plan 32

One thing that a great product manager should always have is a pile of ready to go plans in their back pocket. You have all the plans (I mean PPTs, Power Points) that are company planned, on the so called “Road Map”. Actually I am going to digress here and tell you that if there is a Road Map beware! The kind of process and thinking a Road Map can create can be a real negative, because from experience nay-sayers love to use the Road Map as a way to block new Road Entrances. Never let the Road Map not allow the process to be re-prioritized and redeveloped. I have yet to see the Road Map (in the web feature world) be the best guide. Now, as far as plans are concerned, you have the top line plans already planned out from the execs and board. You have the plans that others know about that you are promoting, and you have a dozen others that they are not aware of, but you have them ready to go, in standby mode, in a file on your hard-drive or cloud, just in case the time is right. Why the three types of plans? Well, part of succeeding is not giving it all away too soon. You have to release plans periodically to the organization, who can’t handle all the plans at once. They have to be part of a series of changes over time. Once again, as a champion, of a lot of other people’s ideas (OPIs), you need to map out these features properly and get your presentations just right. Sometimes you have to sit on things and let osmosis occur. You wake up some morning and your brain somehow figures it out. Who knows why things work that way, but often they do. I would highly recommend sitting down with all the guys and gals who thought them up and show them where there idea is now!

The Shadow Government

Sometimes all the education and all the presentations and all the board room brawls are insignificant compared with the reality that something has to be done subversively. It is a rare thing to do, and there are some well documented cases where it is a necessity. A great example is the case of the James Cannavino at IBM. I read a great story about Jim in the late 1960s trying to convince management that he could speed up the IBM Mainframe. They rejected his notion, but in a subversive move, he had the technology developed outside the company and when it was finished went over his bosses and showed it to the board. He faced either being fired or being promoted. Luckily he was promoted. Hopefully it doesn’t come to this, but sometimes getting things done in an organization require unusual activity, because like I have been inferring there are many more forces at work trying to not make things happen than happen, even on the smallest scale.

Project Mercury

Those funny project names, that often mimic Nasa project names are not just wild imaginative words that are spread around at a company. They are used to get your attention, to try to get the organization to recognize a plan. These project names may sound strange and odd, but customer oriented, improved website features are often a shift and they may seem quite odd at first. Social networking stuff like Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook. These are now household names, but 10 years ago they would sound strange. And it is only going to get stranger. When I say Tweet, Joomla, Droopal, lamp or soap to people in the web world, they better know what I mean… What should be happening in most American web firms is an injection of militarization combined with humor and something to spice it up. That’s what a project name is all about. If project names are not attention-getters, they should be. I would always try to make the name relevant, but a good bit of creativity is a positive not a negative.

Misdirection And The Book Of 5 Rings

Talking about military tactics, people’s military training can go a long way in corporate America. Just because I was not in the army, doesn’t mean we can’t learn from military tactics. They are important. At the end of my MBA program I took a class which revolved around Musashi’s “The Book Of Five Rings“. Musashi is a Japanese expert on war in the middle ages who survived to his old age and therefor, because he was only one of the very few warriors to survive, he wrote about his tactics. One of the tactics listed is a method of drawing an enemy towards oneself and at the last minute let the enemy run themselves off a cliff. In our language we call it misdirection. Sometimes you have to lead people down a path and not stop them from their self destruction. Often your plan has one way of doing things and another person has their plan. If you see their plan is faulty you don’t always have to stop it from failing. Sometimes it is best to let it fail. When I worked back at the phone company we used to leave documents around about projects that were never in existence in order to confuse people about what our real intentions were. Sometimes it is important to not reveal these intentions until you are ready to present and make it happen.

This the second of a 3 part articles. I have not yet finished article 3 about Making the Web Feature Happen.

This is the first article (You should read them in order)

http://www.strategicpoints.com/2011/06/22/web-feature-discovery-process-part-1/

Web Feature Discovery Process – Part 1

Not that I am any bit an expert on web features, product management… and not that I know something that anybody else couldn’t figure out, but I am somewhat obsessed with the website “feature” development process, especially when it comes to overlooked, under-estimated, misused assets. This blog entry is about how I would go about discovering features and services and solutions towards increasing website traffic as well as finding new profitable directions and increasing conversion rates. I am going to give a few examples, mainly from my experience working on a site like Whois.net (which is far from maximized; as far as I know they have just started the process). But first, before I describe the process to develop these features and new products (aka, the old product management process in a new era), first we have to understand the lexicon of the web feature discovery process

Assets

Assets are virtual and sometimes physical things that an organization or company owns and manages. Examples are domain names, websites, email addresses, segmented email addresses, unique site visitors, pageviews, sms, twitter accounts, Facebook and LinkedIn, Persona of the visitors (how can we break up the kinds of visitors based on background), programs and applications, patents, copyrights and internal resources like people. Oh yes, even people are assets. These assets have a value and if you don’t put a value on these assets, you are making a mistake.

You need to start the web feature discovery process by working with asset value and not revenue, because while most everything in marketing is revenue based, the overall value of what you are building towards (ultimately revenue) may be determined by the value of the assets, and assets may ultimately determine long and even short term revenue. When I say assets, many technology and marketing execs would often give me a blank stare, like they have no clue what I am talking about. (I can only chalk this up to the fact that asset value is not how they are compensated, so don’t blame them, blame the boardroom for not keeping up with current valuation measures!) But what is going on in the start-up world, whatwe can call the modern world of business, is a whole new world of asset valuation. And if your division created a website worth $20 million that only made a net income of $100,000 a year, maybe it is time to sell it and take the profits…

The second thing to know about these virtual assets are the more detail you know, and the more they are optimized, the more valuable the assets are worth. We are in a world where websites, domain names and other assets are sold off to make some cash. So, don’t overlook asset creation vs. revenue creation. They now go hand in hand. 20 years ago you would think I’m a loony bird, but the world has changed and companies do sell stuff. At my last firm they did sell assets, except not after we maximized them, but after they personally devalued them.

Often a firm may be collecting email addresses. I say “may”, because some out of the way places don’t. Good luck to those outfits. If most organizations just knew 10 things about these email addresses, what people were interested in, or simple things like their first and last names or where they are located, the asset value of the list may be double or triple the value. Add more detail detail like age, demographics, what they like, who they like, etc and increase the value further.

How do you value these assets? My way of valuing them is simple. If you were to take them away and wanted to get them back, how much would it cost you? For instance, and I am often going to use Whois.net as an example, because that was the last large site I worked on. The Whois domain search site got about 2 million unique visits a month. Now the company saw no real value there because they had a hard time understanding the relationship to their sales, but when I asked execs how much would it cost you to buy 2 million visits a month by buying the PPC (Pay Per Click) words “Domain Name” and “Hosting”, it would have cost them a minimum $2 million dollars a month budget and therefor, just the traffic was worth $12 million a year or $36 million over 3 years. It’s a bit of fuzzy math, but going with “remove it and try to reacquire it”, is a great way to get them to understand. The reason most don’t understand is they typically don’t sell assets and are graded on revenue…but is that really what this is all about in the end… Because if you make something worth millions maybe the asset sales is bigger than any revenue you would ever be able to generate.

So start the process by doing an inventory of assets. First day on the job and you want to make a new web features happen at your web company, start by finding out the basics. What domains do we own? What websites do we run? What are total number of email addresses? How many visitors to each site? How many segments are we catching from customers in the email area? How many members? How many orders? How many skus? How Many? What? Where? Why and How? Get this information down on paper, because this information is the foundation for new and improved services.

Champion

Leaders, execs, people who have an idea, guys in the company basement, people on the customer service lines, MBAs with a business plan or just a lonely CEO with an idea are champions of web features. This means that somebody has to believe in it and want to make it happen. A group of people may want the features to happen, but a person has to ultimately answer and stand up and say I am the product champion. Groups don’t champion stuff, individuals do. This is one of the critical mistakes made by corporations, to think that a group of people will decide by committee ultimately what a web feature will do and how it goes is a big mistake. Not that web features are made by a dictator, and if the champion is a dictator, he probably will fail. If he is a benevolent dictator and listens well, it will succeed. Funny thing is this champion can not be limited to execs with great salaries and titles like VP, Director, CEO, CIO, CTO, BFD or Founder. A champion can and should be everybody. That is what makes companies succeed, not a special group who say only we do the thinking. It can and should by anyone, including employees, shareholders, customers, husbands & wives, sons & daughters, friends and the UPS man. Champions need support and guidance and promoters from above, below and sideways. Being a champion has its risks, as I’ve learned and you can get burned by being the champion or you can get the accolades and make it happen. You can even make it happen and not get the accolades, but then you would have known inside you made it happen. So it does not matter! Money comes later, first comes action!

Little Trees

Years ago we used to pay to plant trees in Israel. And then years later when I visited Israel I got a chance to see those trees grow. In order to grow a tree, a big tree, you have to plant seedlings or small trees. This is where many execs lose their patience and understanding of the product management process. You have to test, test and test again these little trees in order to find a big one. Ok, if you don’t get the tree allegory of ideas, you may be missing the point. Where do you find these little ideas? Somebody recently said, “Dan’s An Idea Guy!” That is not true. I am not an idea guy, I am a guy who listens and hears other people’s concepts and evolves them into ideas. There are ideas all around us, if we would take the time to just listen and sort through the data. Remember, the assets… Just doing an inventory will start to flesh out these little trees or concepts or ideas. One thing I always did at these companies is walk around and chat with the various people in the business. They have ideas. They know what may or may not work and though they don’t know how to implement, they do know something they are not telling everybody. Often its something in the business that bugged them for years that they want to share.

Sharing

Never thought the web feature discovery process would come down to sharing, but learning to share, something my 3 year old has not yet mastered, is the key way towards finding those little trees. People need to get together and chat and think and find answers. These answers are something somebody read somewhere. A company environment where people don’t share their thoughts is a place that will never flesh out new concepts or web features. Look at Google, they are actually asking for the ideas and look what they have produced. If we want the rest of corporate America to be successful on the web, they better listen up and start to share. Like I said earlier, it is the champion that takes an idea and makes sure it happens, not the product management guy or gal. The product management person should be the facilitator and not the creator in the end. Listen and learn, not ignore and complain. Sometimes doing your job requires less not more of giving and taking. Learn from your childhood and share. The secret to sharing is giving of oneself. If you can not give to others, by give I mean tell people something about yourself or your ideas, you will not be able to acquire ideas. The sharing has to start with you.

The Other Guys

Now this is the easiest way to find those things that people have not thought of and get the real brainstorm on what is happening in the market. You actually need to go off and look carefully at the competitors. This is not about mimicking people, this is about concept development. You see a feature on another competitor and you grab it. Fine, but you not only have to take it, you have to own it and therefor it needs to come from you in a new way. What I ended up doing for my Whois.net thesis, which you will read about in my other blog articles on Domain and Whois Tool searches. This meant locking myself up and reading through 500 websites. From this exercise alone I ended up with a dozen new products and features for the Whois.net site. No rocket science involved here. It is simply looking and learning.

Integrative Strategic Thinking (Aha Moments)

Once you have all this data in front of you, such as the assets, the new ideas from those around you, and the competitive information, you now start to see things from a different level. At this higher level, as you look holistically at information. You can start to piece together stuff you did not see originally in just the assets. For instance, when I looked through and discovered that Whois.net did not allow international domain name look-ups, I knew immediately this was an important issue. The importance was simple enough. If you increase upon (extend) what people already like, you will probably have success. They used to call it product extensions. This is where you take a product that is already successful and you add on a new feature or extend the product to new areas. Not a high risk activity. For Whois.net, international domain name traffic look-ups blew out the traffic, automatically doubling it in six months and it tripled and quadrupled traffic over a year. Just satisfying people with stuff they already wanted is easy. However, what is easy to do, is often not seen by the blind. And when you are busy in a high end corporate product management job, you are blinded by the requests from above and from the sides.

Stats and Prioritization

What did I do with the 500 websites I viewed in my these on Whois searches? I came up with a scientific approach to figure out what feature was important. Most of you who read this probably prioritize every day. I rated each feature by value (yes a monetary value), ease of implementation, where I found it, as well as the monetary value of the websites I reviewed. This review process was not about money, it was about assets again. What I focused on, was how do I get visitors to this site, not on how do I convert. I was leaving conversion and selling at this point up to marketing and sales. That was something they knew how to do pretty well. What you need to as a good champion is to understand the data beneath the hood and how to use this data to make a point. Prioritization and hitting low hanging fruit are extremely important ways of working as well. We are in an impatient world, where execs don’t have the time or energy to listen unless they are just seeing the cream of the crop. Maybe they shouldn’t know everything till the time is right. Sometimes companies kill a product or project the first time around because it failed. That does not mean the second time it will be the same.

Learn From Your Mistakes

Organizations that learn from their mistakes and take actions the second time around to make things right are rare. Most organizations bury a concept that has failed and when it is mentioned again by an newbie, the newbie is crushed with the notion that “this has failed here”. This is a big mistake. Failure should never be viewed as a doorway an organization can not go through again. It should, however, be the shining example of how not to do the same thing, the same way. Failure should be used as a way to understand what to do right next time. Like a pyramid, building upon their knowledge, great organizations store this learned mistake information and use it positively going forward.

Leapfrog

One of the concepts I learned while working on a well ignored site like Whois.net was if you are so far behind the competition, it is sometimes worth it, to not mimic, but rather take a leap of faith and go for something greater, different, in a way that competitors would never do. Why won’t they? The competitor has already made their product or web feature decision and taken the current path. If they are leaders in the market already, it will take a lot for them to change. This leap of faith may be something like give it away for free, or combine it with something new or offer something completely different or in a way that is easy to identify but not the same. Simply cookie cutter mimicking is a nuisance on the web. Who wants to go to Bing, when Google does it so well? Why would I ever do that, other than Microsoft has figured out a way to trap me when I load the next IE Browser? Now if Bing did something so different, so incredibly well done, it would make sense. If they were better on an Ipad, sure. If they were better with voice search, sure. If they were bettter or different…it would matter. Making it matter means being different not the same. In the case of Whois.net, I was determined to make the site a competitor with Sedo, the domain auction house, except my idea was to make it a free place to buy and sell domains. Sedo is not free. This is the kind of leap that makes a difference.

Hopefully this blog entry got you interested in discovering a new web feature… I will continue this blog entry in Part 2. Click Here to go to Web Feature Discovery Process – Part 2! And it turns out there will be a part 3, which I am currently working on.